On-Line Tech-Tips Databases

Version 1.18a (16-Feb-13)

Copyright © 1994-2013
Samuel M. Goldwasser
--- All Rights Reserved ---

For contact info, please see the
Sci.Electronics.Repair FAQ Email Links Page.


Reproduction of this document in whole or in part is permitted if both of the following conditions are satisfied:
  1. This notice is included in its entirety at the beginning.
  2. There is no charge except to cover the costs of copying.


Table of Contents



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    Preface

    Author and Copyright

    Author: Samuel M. Goldwasser

    For contact info, please see the Sci.Electronics.Repair FAQ Email Links Page.

    Copyright © 1994-2013
    All Rights Reserved

    Reproduction of this document in whole or in part is permitted if both of the following conditions are satisfied:

    1.This notice is included in its entirety at the beginning.
    2.There is no charge except to cover the costs of copying.

    DISCLAIMER

    Every attempt has been made to assure that the information in this document is up to date and accurate. However, these Web sites come and go without prior notice and may change their access policies including charges or restrictions. In addition, their recommendations may not be correct resulting in added time, expense, and possible damage to equipment. They also assume that the user is aware of required electrical and fire safety guidelines and precautions.

    We will not be responsible for damage to equipment, your ego, blown parts, county wide power outages, spontaneously generated mini (or larger) black holes, planetary disruptions, or personal injury that may result from the use of this material.



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    Introduction

    Scope of This Document

    Note: This document replaces the individual sections in each of major repair guides.

    A number of organizations have compiled databases covering thousands of common problems with VCRs, TVs, computer monitors, and other electronic equipment. Most charge for their information but a few, accessible via the Internet, are either free or have a very minimal monthly or per-case fee. In other cases, a limited but still useful subset of the for-fee database is freely available.

    A tech-tips database is a collection of problems and solutions accumulated by the organization providing the information or other sources based on actual repair experiences and case histories. Since the identical failures often occur at some point in a large percentage of a given model or product line, checking out a tech-tips database may quickly identify your problem and solution.

    In that case, you can greatly simplify your troubleshooting or at least confirm a diagnosis before ordering parts. My only reservation with respect to tech-tips databases in general - this has nothing to do with any one in particular - is that symptoms can sometimes be deceiving and a solution that works in one instance may not apply to your specific problem. Therefore, an understanding of the hows and whys of the equipment along with some good old fashioned testing is highly desirable to minimize the risk of replacing parts that turn out not to be bad.

    The other disadvantage - at least from one point of view - is that you do not learn much by just following a procedure developed by others. There is no explanation of how the original diagnosis was determined or what may have caused the failure in the first place. Nor is there likely to be any list of other components that may have been affected by overstress and may fail in the future. Replacing Q701 and C725 may get your equipment going again but this will not help you to repair a different model in the future.

    One alternative to tech-tips databases is to search via Google Groups (formerly Deja.com/Dejanews) for postings with keywords matching your model and problem and the USENET newsgroup sci.electronics.repair. See the document: Troubleshooting of Consumer Electronic Equipment for more information.

    Safety

    The people who compile tech-tips databases assume you know what you are doing, at least to the extent of taking appropriate precautions to minimize the possibility of bodily harm and equipment damage. Before going inside any piece of electronic equipment, make sure you understand and follow the guidelines in the document: Notes on Safety. If you are at all unsure of your understanding of this safety info, take the equipment to a professional for repair or buy a new one. Your life is more valuable than the few dollars you might save by doing it yourself!



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    List of On-Line Tech-Tips Databases

    This list is a lot shorter than it was the last time I went through and checked the tech-tips sites to be sure they still existed. :(

    These types of sites seem to come and go so it is worth checking them out from time-to-time even if you don't have a pressing need. If possible, download and archive any useful information for use on a rainy day in the future. Some also include many useful links in addition to the tech-tips info so are worth investigating even if you don't have a specific symptom to deal with! The sites in this list were active as of the version date and most of thenm have been around for several years - that's all I'll guarantee! :)



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